International organisations

Over the last 20 years, sophisticated and effective drug law reform advocacy and policy organisations have emerged internationally, providing a wealth of resources and strategies. Unharm supporter Rosie Shea compiled this list of some of the best organisations for you to check out.International_reform_orgs.jpg

  • The Drug Policy Alliance (USA) http://www.drugpolicy.org/ is an advocacy organisation that runs campaigns, actively engages in media and communications and provides resources to enable decentralised grass-roots advocacy. DPA runs the biennial Reform Conference

  • Transform (UK) http://www.tdpf.org.uk/ develops and promotes evidence-based frameworks for the legal regulation of drugs. Transform also supports the campaign Anyone's child which unites families who want better drug laws.

  • The Global Commission on Drug Policy http://www.globalcommissionondrugs.org/ promotes informed, science-based discussion about humane and effective ways to reduce the harm caused by drugs to people and societies. Advocates for reform, who have represented the organisation include former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan and former President of Brazil Fernando Henrique Cardoso.

  • The International Drug Policy Consortium http://idpc.net/ is a global network of non-government organisations that promotes objective and open debate on the effectiveness, direction and content of drug policies at the national and international level, and supports evidence-based policies that are effective at reducing drug-related harm.

  • The International Network of People Who Use Drugs (INPUD) http://www.inpud.net/ is a movement of people who use or used drugs and who support The Vancouver Declaration. INPUD is a global network that seeks to represent people who use drugs in international agencies such as the United Nations and with those undertaking international development work.

  • Students for Sensible Drug Policy (USA) http://ssdp.org/  Students for Sensible Drug Policy is an international grassroots network of students pushing for sensible policies to achieve a safer and more just future, while fighting back against counterproductive Drug War policies, particularly those that directly harm students and youth.

  • Harm Reduction International (UK) http://www.ihra.net/ is a leading non-governmental organisation working to promote and expand support for harm reduction. With over 8,000 members worldwide, Harm Reduction International is the largest membership-based global harm reduction association. 

  • Open Society Foundations (USA) http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/topics/drug-policy-reform  The Open Society Foundations work to build vibrant and tolerant societies whose governments are accountable and open to the participation of all people. We seek to strengthen the rule of law; respect for human rights, minorities, and a diversity of opinions; democratically elected governments; and a civil society that helps keep government power in check. We help to shape public policies that assure greater fairness in political, legal, and economic systems and safeguard fundamental rights.

  • The Beckley Foundation (UK) http://www.beckleyfoundation.org/ supports and promotes scientific research into drugs and drug policy development.

  • Release (UK) http://www.release.org.uk/ provides legal services, counseling and campaigns in support of a just and fair society where drug policies should reduce the harms associated with drugs, and where those who use drugs are treated based on principles of human rights, dignity and equality.
  • Count the Costs http://www.countthecosts.org/ is a multi-agency project that aims to reduce the costs created or exacerbated by drug law enforcement. It has compiled and made accessible comprehensive international data on the costs of drug prohibition


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